So what else is new?

Interpol has always advertised itself as being a ‘power for good’, and it states that it ‘exists to help create a safer world by supporting law enforcement agencies worldwide to combat crime’

All well and good, and many if not most of the police who are seconded from its member countries are dedicated officers.

In its ‘mission statement’, Interpol talks about battling corruption, as corruption undermines political, social and economic stability. It threatens security and damages trust and public confidence in systems which affect people’s daily lives. Although corruption frequently occurs at local or national level, its consequences are global; its hidden costs immense.

Interpol also states its mission is to enhance co-operation among member countries and stimulate the exchange of information between all national and international enforcement bodies concerned with countering organized crime groups and related corruption. Drawing on the wide investigative and analytical experience of its multinational staff, Interpol helps 188 member countries.

Jackie Selebi, a former political ally of Thabo Mbeki was given the top police job in South Africa despite having no police experience whatsoever. Jackie Selebi, National Commissioner of the South African Police Service, served as INTERPOL President from 2004 until 12 January 2008.

His previous positions include:South Africa’s representative at the United Nations, Chairman of the Human Rights Commission of the United Nations 54th Session, Chairman of the Anti-Landmine Conference, Oslo.

So what do readers think of the very recent conviction of Jackie Selebi for corruption in South Africa. Was he the right man for the job in 2004, and if so, what would a logical explanation be for his fall from grace in 2010?