The BBC, otherwise known as ‘No right-wing views here; please!


When we read or hear something broadcast especially when it is in a  political context; from a National broadcaster such as the BBC, the ‘more alert’ amongst us have to bring into use (in computer and phone parlance) an App. In a thousandth of a second, we have to a) remember who is talking, then remember b) what they have said in the past, then we have to c) decide if their built-in left-wing and liberal bias is firing at full blast, then d) decipher the news and determine how to approach the item to determine what has actually happened. If I were such a composer, I would name this App. as ‘The Searching the Haystack Syndrome’.

I write on this well-known problem mainly because it should be both well-known and acknowledged, but somehow is not. The BBC seems to bask in the glow created during its formative years, which was reinforced by its operations during the Second World War; and the manner in which its World Service broadcast arm seems to have avoided the dreary group-think adopted by just about all of its national and local broadcast stations. I think the problem is best described by an interview between a mildly right-wing commentator and members of the BBC journalism staff. They interviewed him, and seemed (to the interviewee) to be satisfied with the recorded clip, but it was never broadcast. When asked why the clip was silenced, the communal reply was that although the man was perfectly polite and sincere, he was also quite obviously mad for holding and propagating the views he held so steadfastly!

As background to that which I am about to write, we must examine the reasons behind the overthrow of the Muslim Brotherhood’s Egyptian President. For many centuries, Egypt has been a country with a Muslim tradition, but one lightly applied. Orthodox and Coptic Catholics have lived and thrived, there has been no tradition of Theocracy, or religious rule; the mullahs have had their place, but have never been allowed to interfere with how the Nation is run, as it should be. But ex-President Morsi intended to grab even more power than that handed to him through the electoral process, and once he commenced meetings with Iran’s swivel-eyed leadership, and installed former terrorists as Provincial Governors; and pushing for ever-more Islamic rule and diktat, the People, in their tens of millions, said ‘Enough is enough’. Fortunately, the military were and had been listening, organised their ranks against their old foe, and kicked him out.

When Jim Naughtie of the BBC’s Today Programme was broadcasting this morning on his travels through Cairo, and of the Egyptians whom he met and spoke with, he told of a man who approached his car and attempted to sell him a photocard featuring General Abdul Fattah al-Sisi, the leading general and author of the military take-over. Jim Naughtie did not say how he turned down the offer of the photograph, but left the listener in no doubt as to his (Naughtie’s) opinion of that courageous military soldier who had acted in Egypt’s best interests. At every opportunity, we are reminded by all the BBC’s reporters and commentators, that Morsi had been ‘elected’ and as such should have been regarded as akin to a minor god, instead of the scheming and obdurate political and religious cynic he so obviously was.

To give you further insight into the very way this influential broadcaster’s mind works, I recall he was doing a small clip with a Scotswoman who was retailing how she had trapped and despatched some small rodents. When she told him she had killed around twenty, his reply was a shocked “but thats murder!”

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